Tag Archives: lauren

ALL THE BOYERS EVER: A profile story by an actual Boyer

 

Aside from Donald, these are all the Boyers you'll ever need to know. Meet my family -- Stan, Ann, and Casey.

Aside from Donald, these are all the Boyers you’ll ever need to know. Meet my fabulous family — Stan (the man), Ann, and Casey.

This story seems, at first, kind of self-serving.

Except it’s not.

I’ve never been a huge genealogy person. I know what I know, and that’s enough.

Maybe I’m scared what a little research might reveal. Maybe I’ll find out some of my relatives were heinous criminals or total weirdo losers.

Or maybe I just don’t care all that much.

But that’s OK. Donald Boyer cares enough  for the both of us. Continue reading

10 reasons why it’s pretty depressing that the “The Office” strip club debate is over

Last night, Chanceford Township zoning hearing board members denied “The Office” strip club from opening in the township.

It’s a saga that began in March — one that had a largely Christian community up in arms about the possibility of nakeds within their hallowed boundaries.

The decision is a relief for some.

For me, it’s bittersweet. I loved traveling to The Brogue for the last four hearings for many reasons , some of which have nothing to do with always-hilarious references to G-strings and pasties.

So, in no particular order, here are the Top 10 things I’ll miss about this issue being kaput for now: Continue reading

Toilet paper goes tubeless: Some York countians say they would miss the cardboard core

Originally published on Page A1 of the York Daily Record/Sunday News on Tuesday, July 12, 2011.

By LAUREN BOYER 
Daily Record/Sunday News

It’s always been there. Through thick and thin, you could always count on it until the end — of the  toilet  paper roll.

But things are changing. Kimberly-Clark has begun testing sales of the Scott Naturals Tube-Free brand of TP that doesn’t need a cardboard core to keep the good times rolling.

It’s the biggest change seen by  toilet  paper users since the roll first appeared in the 1800s. Continue reading