How do you write an obituary for a cookie?

This photo, provided by Rodney Stauffer, was too grainy to use for print. It's a old Milk Custard box.

This photo, provided by Rodney Stauffer, was too grainy to use for print. It’s a old Milk Custard box.

This might be one of my favorite consumer-y stories I’ve done in a long time.

It started with an email about cookies. People couldn’t find them.

At first, I thought it sounded ridiculous.

It’s a fact of life. Companies discontinue products all the time.

After all, whatever happened to French Toast Crunch or Surge? BuzzFeed has a pretty good list right here.

So, what makes this situation different?

I’m going out on a limb here. No one’s holiday traditions (God. At least I hope not.) are tied to short-lived sugary soft drinks or strange, toast-shaped cereals.

I later learned from Rodney Stauffer that Milk Custard cookies and Peanut Butter Goodies have a long history.

Stauffer’s grandfather developed them in late 1930s.

The company was founded in 1871.

(Side note: We’re talking about the people that brought you the animal crackers of your childhood. Respect.)

The Stauffer family sold their remaining interest in the company to Japan-based Meiji in the early 2000s.

I learned through Facebook that people were, indeed, missing the absence of these York County delicacies this year.

So — love it or hate it — this is how I found my sources.

fbstauffer

I did it the good old fashioned way: commenting on every post I could find on the Stauffer’s Cookies Facebook page.

No one was angry. Just confused.

They shared a passion for a product that is no longer available.

So, I wrote an obituary for cookies, I guess.

It was kind of hard to describe them, initially.

Confession: I’m not from York. I’ve never actually eaten a Peanut Butter Goodie or a Milk Custard.

And now, I probably won’t.

But that’s just the way the cookie crumbles.

(Ha. I so funny.)

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One response to “How do you write an obituary for a cookie?

  1. Pingback: A year in review: Thirteen things I learned in 2013 | BY LAUREN BOYER

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